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Showing 1 - 10 of 110239 pathways
PathBank ID Pathway Chemical Compounds Proteins

SMP0122266

Pw123574 View Pathway
Metabolite

Methylglyoxal Degradation I

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
The degradation of methylglyoxal starts with methylglyoxal being degraded by interacting with glutathione and a glyoxalase resulting in the release of a (R)-S-lactoylglutatione. This compound in turn reacts with a water molecule through a glyoxalase II resulting in the releas of glutathione, a hydrogen ion and an R-lactate. The R-lactate in turn reacts with an ubiquinone through a D-lactate dehydrogenase resulting in the release of an ubiquinol and a pyruvate which can then be incorporated the pyruvate metabolism

Metabolic

SMP0122265

Pw123573 View Pathway
Metabolite

Cyclopropane Fatty Acid (CFA) Biosynthesis

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Cyclopropane fatty acids (CFA) are synthesized by the modification of an unsaturated bond of acyl chains of phospholipid bilayers by methylenation via cyclopropane fatty acyl phospholipid synthase. CFA phospholipid synthase is a unique enzyme in that it acts on the nonpolar part of the phospholipids. The bond that is modified is about nine to eleven carbon atoms from the glycerol backbone. S-adenosyl-L-methionine donates a methylene group to the cis double bond of the unsaturated fatty acid. CFA synthase acts on phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine. Cyclopropane fatty acids in the cytoplasmic membrane protect cells from ethanol, high osmotic pressure and other environmental stressors.

Metabolic

SMP0122264

Pw123572 View Pathway
Metabolite

2-Oxoglutarate Decarboxylation to Succinyl-CoA

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is consisted of oxoglutarate decarboxylase, dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase), which is a rate-limiting enzyme of the citric acid cycle (TCA cycle) in prokaryote. The reaction that catalyzed by 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex can be generalized as 2-oxoglutarate + coenzyme A + NAD+ → succinyl-CoA + CO2 + NADH. During the OGDHC reaction cycle, 2-oxoglutarate is bound and decarboxylated by E1(o), a thiamin-diphosphate cofactor containing enzyme. The succinyl group is transferred to the lipoyl domain of E2(o) where it is carried to the active site and transferred to coenzyme A, forming succinyl-CoA. During this transfer the lipoyl group is reduced to dihydrolipoyl. The succinyl-CoA is released and the lipoyl domain of E2(o) is oxidized by E3 via transfer of protons to NAD, forming NADH and regenerating the lipoyl group back to lipoyllysine for another cycle. Under aerobic growth conditions the OGDHC not only catalyzes a key reaction in the TCA cycle, it also provides succinyl-CoA for methionine and lysine biosynthesis, the latter pathway also leading to peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The synthesis of the OGDHC is repressed by anaerobiosis and is also subject to glucose repression. It is induced by aerobic growth on acetate. (EcoCyc)

Metabolic

SMP0122263

Pw123571 View Pathway
Metabolite

Lipoate Biosynthesis and Incorporation I

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Lipoate is an essential cofactor for key enzymes of oxidative metabolism. Mechanism of lipoate biosynthesis is similar to biotin biosynthesis. Octanoyltransferase facilitates the tranfer of octanoate moiety from octanoate-ACP to particular lysyl residues in lipoate-dependent enzymes. This process regenerates the acyl-carrier in the process, and create an octanylated domains in lipoate-dependent enzymes. Lipoyl synthase combines with S-adenosyl-L-methionine to generate an active lipoylated domain by converting the octanoyl side chain to an active lipoyl. Lipoyl synthase also split S-Adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) into 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical (later becomes 5'-deoxyadenosine by abstracting a hydrogen from a C-H bond) and L-methionine. L-methionine will undergo S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Biosynthesis.

Metabolic

SMP0122262

Pw123570 View Pathway
Metabolite

Xylose Degradation I

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Escherichia coli can utilize D-xylose as the sole source of carbon and energy for the cell. A low-affinity proton motive force or a high-affinity ATP-driven (ABC) transport system brings unphosphorylated D-xylose into the cell. Following entry, D-xylose is converted to D-xylulose by an isomerase and then converted to the pentose phosphate pathway intermediate, D-xylulose 5-phosphate via a kinase. D-xylulose 5-phosphate can then enter pathways of metabolism to meet the cells needs.

Metabolic

SMP0122261

Pw123569 View Pathway
Metabolite

Ribose Degradation

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Escherichia coli can utilize the monosaccharide D-ribose as the sole source of carbon and energy for the cell. A high-affinity ABC transport system transports D-ribose into the cell as unphosphorylated beta-D-ribopyranose. Ribose pyranase converts between the furanose and pyranose forms of beta-D-ribose. D-ribofuranose converts between the alpha and beta anomers quickly and spontaneously. Ribokinase converts D-ribose to the pentose phosphate pathway intermediate, D-ribose 5-phosphate, which can enter the central metabolism pathways to meet the cells needs.

Metabolic

SMP0122260

Pw123568 View Pathway
Metabolite

D-Serine Degradation

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
The degradation of D-serine begins with the transport of D-serine into the cytosol through a cycA. Once in the cytosol D-serine reacts with ammonia-lyase resulting in the release of a hydrogen ion, water and a 2-aminoprop-2-enoate. This compound in turn reacts spontaneously to produces 2-iminipropanoate. This compound in turn reacts with water and hydrogen ion spontaneously resulting in the release of ammonium and apyruvate.

Metabolic

SMP0122259

Pw123567 View Pathway
Metabolite

Cyanate Degradation

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
The cyanate degradation pathway begins with the transportation of cyanate into the cytosol through a cynX transporter. Once inside the cytosol cyanate reacts with hydrogen carbonate and a hydrogen ion through a cyanase resulting in the release of carbon dioxide and carbamate. Carbamate reacts spontaneously with hydrogen resulting in the release of ammonium and carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide reacts with water through carbonic anhydrase resulting in the release of hydrogen ion and hydrogen carbonate.

Metabolic

SMP0122258

Pw123566 View Pathway
Metabolite

Trehalose Degradation I (Low Osmolarity)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
In E.coli, trehalose can be only synthesized with high osmolarity, and if the osmolarity is low, then the source of trehalose can be only obtained from external via transportation with trehalose PTS permease. However, sugar can be degraded with both low or high osmolarity in E.coli. Glucokinase can phosphorylate free gluocose into glucose-6-phosphate and both glucose-6-phosphate moieties enter glycolysis.

Metabolic

SMP0122257

Pw123565 View Pathway
Metabolite

Ethanolamine Metabolism

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Ethanolamine, in E. coli, is produced through phospholipid biosynthesis. Once in the cytosol it can be used to produce acetaldehyde by reacting with ethanolamine ammonia-lyase resulting in the release of ammonium and acetaldehyde.

Metabolic
Showing 1 - 10 of 110239 pathways